Programme Notes

BFI Southbank

Dobaaraa

+ Q&A with Anurag Kashyap and other special guests India’s internationally best known director, Anurag Kashyap, returns to the festival with this surreal Sliding Doors-style story of a young n...

Wayfinder

+ Q&A with director Larry Achiampong and Executive Director of Knowledge and Collections, BFI National Archive, Arike Oke Wayfinder is Larry Achiampong’s first feature and most ambitious film ...

I Could Go On Singing

Introduced by Dirk Bogarde’s nephew, Ulric van den Bogarde (Tuesday 28 June only.) A contemporary review Movie stars have been rather out of fashion ever since Hollywood discovered the Actors’ Stu...

Le Havre

Aki Kaurismäki on ‘Le Havre’ A character named Marcel Marx appeared in your 1992 film La Vie de bohème: and André Wilms plays him again in Le Havre . Is he the same character? Yes, I saved some t...

A Star Is Born

Time magazine described Garland’s performance as ‘just about the finest one-woman show in modern movie history’ and it’s still hard to believe that she didn’t win the Best Actress Oscar® for it. Ne...

The Devil, Probably

SPOILER WARNING The following notes give away some of the plot. Contemporary reviews Having made his decision to trust his cellmate, the condemned man puts his escape plan into practice and drops ...

Certain Women

Taken from Maile Meloy’s stories, Kelly Reichardt’s wonderful triptych focuses on four women (and, sometimes, the men in their lives) trying to get by in rural America. The narrative is quiet, elli...

Judy's Jukebox Singalong

To celebrate 100 years of the brilliant Judy Garland, we present a jukebox night playing clips of some of the best-known hits from her career. Our guest host Caroline George will lead you through s...

Looking for Langston

The influence of Isaac Julien’s groundbreaking, lyrical and poetic meditation on the life of revered Harlem Renaissance poet Langston Hughes still ripples throughout the representation of queerness...

Lancelot du Lac

It won’t be to all tastes, but there’s an aesthetic purity to Robert Bresson’s approach that gives Lancelot du Lac a startling, timeless quality. He chooses to shoot only parts of the body, often c...

Earwig

+ Q&A with director Lucile Hadžihalilović There is no straight story coming any time soon from David Lynch’s closest filmmaking heir, Lucile Hadžihalilović. Her new film – her first in English...

Stranger by the Lake

Imagine Bresson making an explicit gay erotic thriller. Unlikely, but Alain Guiraudie may have had him in mind when making this tale of a man disappointed by his encounters on a cruising beach unt...

GoodFellas

Before landing his signature role in GoodFellas (1990), Ray Liotta broke through with two truly opposite supporting turns. In Jonathan Demme’s comedy Something Wild (1986), Liotta’s volatile ex-con...

Swan Song

Director’s Statement Back in 1984, I walked into my small-town gay bar for the first time – The Universal Fruit and Nut Company. There he was, glittering on the dancefloor. Wearing a teal feather ...

Rosetta

I saw Rosetta three weeks ago, and haven’t recovered from it since. In fact, I didn’t see any film since the Dardennes’, except films for work. It moves me to the heart of my heart, this film about...

Bergman Island

Vicky Krieps and Tim Roth are ‘Chris’ and ‘Tony’, a couple on a summer retreat to Fårö, the Swedish island home of Ingmar Berman. Both are filmmakers hoping to make progress on their respective scr...

All My Friends Hate Me

Just because you’re paranoid, Joseph Heller noted, doesn’t mean they aren’t after you. This is birthday boy Pete’s own Catch-22: invited by his old university crew to a country mansion celebration,...

Une femme douce

Dostoevsky wrote A Gentle Creature in 1876 (five years before his death) and included it in his Writer’s Journal. He had heard of three suicides, young women who had died within a matter of months....

Wot! No Art

Introduced by BFI National Archive Curator Steve Foxon Christopher Mason’s documentary presents a retrospective of the arts in the immediate post-war years (1945-51), when patronage for ‘public ar...

Thief

On paper, Michael Mann’s feature debut Thief is nothing groundbreaking, fit to be consigned to that vague category of ‘neo-noir’. Certainly the basic materials of the plot – the hood looking for a ...